Friday, October 21, 2011

Special Report - Guest Post


Hi Everyone,

Today i divert from the schedule to share this write-up with you. A couple days ago, i got a comment asking me to email back, because the person had a question for me. The person turned out to be David Haas who is very passionate about Cancer and is a member of the Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance, who have been serving cancer patients and their families for over 30 years . You can follow them on twitter or facebook and also check out their website.

ATTENTION: I would like to point out that though this is talking about people who have cancer, those of us who are fortunate enough to not have it, can also benefit by changing our lifestyle and exercise habits to PREVENT cancer. Also this information is so so you can help anyone around you who might have cancer. So please share this information, be kind to your body and may God help us all.

Recovering from Cancer through exercise and lifestyle
By: David Haas

A cancer diagnosis can be a life-changing event for many people, but there are several lifestyle changes that a patient can make to improve recovery. While chemotherapy and a medically supervised treatment program are essential for any cancer patient, diet and exercise can have a positive impact on healing times and quality of life. An active lifestyle and exercise helps release endorphins, which work as natural painkillers in the body. During chemotherapy, many patients may experience systemic or generalized pain. Exercise can help reduce chronic pain, while improving patient health. There are many low impact exercises that cancer patients can do during treatment and recovery. Most exercise results in an elevated heart rate and increased breathing rate.

For some patients with cancers such as lung cancer or rare mesothelioma, fast breathing may be painful or impractical. Yoga can be an effective form of exercise for patients, as it concentrates on slow breathing and relaxation. Yoga is a form of exercise where patients hold poses and practice relaxation. Yoga provides low impact movements that tone and exercise the entire body, without putting excessive strain on any individual tendons or joints. For patients who have been sedentary or bedridden, yoga can be a great way exercise the entire body in a safe and relaxing environment.

Swimming is a popular form of exercise therapy. Swimming requires the use of muscles across the entire body, and can range from low intensity to high intensity. Many swimming facilities have instructors trained in physical therapy, who can help cancer patients find the swimming exercises that best meet their individual needs. Cycling or spin classes can also be a great option for many cancer patients. Spin classes allow cancer patients to experience rigorous cardiovascular exercise in a controlled environment. Many spin class instructors can tailor a class to meet each person's individual needs, while allowing group exercise in a fun environment.

Exercise can also be as simple as walking. The National Institute of Health recommends that adults spend at least 30 minutes a day walking, to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Spending time outdoors can be a great way to beat depression, and an excellent way to meet new people. Maintaining a positive attitude is essential during any form of cancer treatment, and meeting new people can be a great way to improve attitude and mood. Exercise can improve health, lower recovery times, and improve mood in many cancer patients. While medical treatment is necessary for many forms of cancer, lifestyle and diet can improve quality of life during recovery.
-----
P.S Special thank you to David Haas for counting my blog worthy to share this information.
P.s.s I Love You. We will have Blithed roses on Sunday.

3 comments:

  1. Quite an informative article. I've missed your blog and story. How you dey?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Informative....looking forward to Blithed Roses

    ReplyDelete
  3. Some of my friend's people have been dealing with cancer. Good info

    Adiya
    Muse Origins

    ReplyDelete

J'apprécie réactions, surtout quand ils sont constructifs. Pas d'insultes s'il vous plaît.